Are Dachshunds Expensive to Own?


Is your heart set on bringing home a Dachshund puppy? Yes, they are adorable, loyal, and energetic. These characteristics make them the thirteenth most popular dog in the United States.

Unsurprisingly, a breed that is this popular cannot come cheap. But how costly are we talking about here? Is there any chance you may get a cheap Dachshund pup? What about the total cost of owning a Dachshund? Is it going to be affordable in the long run? Read on to get answers to these questions and make an informed decision.

Cost of Buying a Dachshund Puppy

When adding a Dachshund to your family, the common practice is to buy a puppy rather than adopting an adult dog. The reason is that people have the idea that adult Dachshunds can be stubborn and slightly difficult. Although, this is not necessarily true. The other reason most people prefer to buy a new puppy is that they can choose the type of dachshund they prefer.  

A Dachshund pup can cost anywhere between $200 and $3500. Why is the range so large? It is so because the price of a Dachshund pup depends on the type of Dachshund and their coat colors, and the quality of breeding.

Genuinely purebred Dachshunds would cost the most as they are often termed show-quality dogs. Backyard breeders and breeding mills may be able to provide you with a cheaper pup, but these dogs might not be purebred. And more importantly, these dogs are not treated well or brought up in a healthy environment. You should avoid buying a dog from a puppy mill and should only buy a puppy from a backyard breeder if you are familiar with their operation and know that their dogs are healthy and well treated. 

Are Dapple Dachshunds More Expensive?

Talking about different coats, one variety that is extremely rare but highly sought-after is the Dapple Dachshund. If that is the one you seek, be prepared to loosen your purse strings a little bit more.

A Dapple Dachshund pup typically costs more than other varieties of Dachshund because it takes a lot of effort to breed them well. The merle gene is common in these pups and it takes a responsible and knowledgeable breeder to know exactly how to get the breeding right so that you have a healthy pup in your family.

Why Are Dachshunds So Expensive?

Dachshunds must be bred well. A quality breeder incurs a huge cost to breed the litter from where your pup is out for sale. He then has to add costs of food, shelter, initial medical expenses, and then add a profit.

To top it, the cost also reflects the huge demand and supply gap of Dachshunds. These lovable dogs are highly sought-after, but pure breeds are somewhat rare. So, a Dachshund is always going to cost a lot of money. Related post: Dachshund Adoption: What to expect

Average Cost of Owning a Dachshund

Apart from the cost of buying the pup and some one-time expenses such as vaccines, initial medical check-up, neutering, etc., you must also account for the regular expenses that you need to handle throughout the lifetime of your pet.

All of these expenses fall under the cost of ownership and you must be prepared for these expenses before you run to a breeder or a rescue shelter to bring a pup home.

Let us break down these expenses to the basic needs of the dog as follows.

Food

When you bring your Dachshund pup home, you would be surprised at how much the little sausage dog can eat! But do not worry. The cost of feeding your puppy will still be less than $50 a month.

It may have been lesser, but Dachshunds are difficult to train and hence require lots of treats. So, it is better to have an extra cushion of expenses set just to buy those tasty treats.

Beds

You want your pup to be comfortable when asleep and that is why you may have thought about buying the best bed that is out there for your pet. You could make your dog’s bed yourself, which could be a cheaper option, but for some people, time is a constraint.

In such cases, if you decide to buy a bed and bedding accessories specially designed for your dog, you are probably looking at an expense of up to $100 a year.

Toys

This is one area where you may be able to save some money. Dachshunds do not prefer chewable toys much and would rather jump and run around than sit in one corner with a designated toy.

You may still need to buy some for teething and training purposes, for which roughly $50 a year would suffice.

Leashes and Collars

A leash or a collar is more of a one-time expense (or at least until the first one wears out) and could vary in costs depending on whether you are looking for something basic or highly advanced such as sensor-based ID tags. An average leash or collar should cost you about $30 to $40.

Grooming

Grooming your dog is essential, especially if you have a hairy Dachshund. Some grooming and cleaning activities can be carried out at home, such as cleaning your dog’s ears and eyes, trimming its nails, and so on. This would substantially reduce the grooming costs to up to $30 a year. But if you are looking at professional grooming services then the cost could shoot up to about $300 annually.

Routine Veterinary Care

Here lies the importance of buying your pup from a responsible breeder. You then have lesser chances of winding up with a sick dog that requires constant medical care.

Having said that, even healthy Dachshunds require a lot of medical attention because they are prone to back problems (a bane of their sausage shape). Annual veterinary costs for a Dachshund could be as high as $300-$400 and an additional $500 for dental care.

Preventive Medications and Supplements

Dogs, especially ones such as a Dachshund that love the outdoors, easily get infected with fleas, ticks, bacteria, and fungi. Hence, certain preventive medications must be administered regularly to avoid serious health concerns.

Certain supplements such as omega 3s may also be required for your Dachshund, particularly because they are prone to backbone issues. These costs could go up to $500 a year.

Obedience Classes or Training Resources

Training expenses can be both one-time and regular. Remember that a Dachshund is challenging to train and thus may require an extra set of obedience classes. Such classes could cost up to $200 at a time.

Additionally, at-home training may also require you to spend up to $300 a year, depending on how many training resources you are willing to purchase.

Dog Walking

Most people themselves walk their dogs. It creates mutual bonding and is hence the preferred choice. It also costs nothing. But others have a busy lifestyle and cannot find enough time to walk their dogs. Enter the dog walker who charges roughly $20 for a walk.

Pet Sitters or Boarding

Then there are vacations you would love to take and unfortunately would need to leave your dog behind. In such cases, you could either hire a pet sitter or find some boarding facilities.

Either way, you could be looking at an expense of around $300-$500 a year, which of course, goes up if you travel more than twice a year.

Emergencies and Other Unexpected Expenses

Unpredictable incidents can occur in anyone’s life, even in your dog’s. It is best to keep aside some of your savings for such emergencies. God forbid, if your dog needs immediate veterinary assistance, surgery, or a chronic illness creeps up, you may end up spending thousands of dollars at one go.

It is also a good idea to invest in pet insurance so that such unforeseen circumstances are taken care of. A pet insurance premium can be as low a $10 per month or may rise to $50 a month, depending on the coverage. Related post: Do You Need Pet Insurance For Your Dachshund?

Tips for buying a Dachshund Puppy

Buying a Dachshund puppy is a huge commitment. It is easy to feel lost and end up getting a puppy that is sick or poorly bred, leading to large costs of ownership. Here are a few things to keep in mind before bringing a Dachshund pup home.

-Be prepared for a dog that looks cute but is difficult to train
-Prepare your savings and your health so that you can take care of a —-Dachshund’s health concerns
-Choose a responsible breeder and avoid puppy mills
-Never pay for a pup you have not met yet. The world is full of scammers
-Don’t say “no” to rescue shelters.
-Chances are their Dachshunds are easier to raise and healthier than the ones at your local pet store

So, there you go. Save up, prepare for the regular expenses, research the breeder, and be ready to provide a warm welcome to your loving, loyal companion.

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Related post: New puppy checklist: Must-have supplies for your new puppy

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Are Dachshunds Expensive to Own?